PTWWW & New To Me Poetry: Epigrams

For the Paint The World With Words “Be Inspired Challenge” this week, we are playing with Epigrams. An Epigram is defined as, “a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.”

My epigram came from wondering what the hell I was going to write for an epigram:

In the recess of thought, great words sit;
awaiting the writer to unleash their wit.
They lay in silence and pique’d fit;
for most, including me, aren’t up to it.
 

I also decided to try my hand at some other epigrams:

Faith is a five-year-old’s belief in parents perfection. Wisdom is the realization they are not.

I love movies. They divorce people from reality, who in turn divorce each other because their reality is not a movie. 

Writers strive to reveal society’s troubles. Society obliges by giving them so much to write about.

Zeal is great…until it crosses to zealotry. Then, not so much.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

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PTWWW-Found Poem: Stand

Photo via @NU_Sports

Photo via @NU_Sports

Stand With Purdue.

fans at a basketball game paint letters across their chests,

usually the name of their school or its star player.

a group of Northwestern students,

went with something more meaningful-

when the Wildcats hosted Purdue.

a gunman shot and killed Purdue student Andrew Boldt

inside the school’s electrical engineering building.

Stand With Purdue.

publisher of PurpleWildcats.com tried to approach

the students with “Stand With Purdue” on their chests,

in hopes of landing an interview.

They didn’t want the attention.

Cool stuff.

Stand With Purdue.

***

For Paint The World With Words poetry form of the week: Found Poem. A found poem relies exclusively on outside text, ‘as is’ for the most part, for creation. The poet determines the shape and form the poem will take.

My poem comes from this story by Jeff Eisenberg. All credit for the words goes to him, I merely reshaped them into a different form.

Hats off to the students at Northwestern, and condolences and thoughts go out to those affected by the tragedy.

New To Me Poetry-Triolet: Memories Fade

Memories fade into the twilight mist;
*confusion-loss* sense of self gone.
Where was I when love first kissed,
memories fade into the twilight mist.
 
Children are treasures sorely missed;
faces of family and friends hidden by curtains drawn.
Memories fade into the twilight mist.
Confusion…loss…sense of self gone.
 
 

For Paint The World With Words “Be Inspired” challenge. This week’s poetry form is the Triolet. A triolet is characterized by having two stanzas of four lines each. The first line of the first stanza also serves as the fourth and seventh line of the poem. The second line of the first stanza also serves as the last line of the poem. It has an ABaA abAB rhyme scheme (capital letters denote repeated lines). There are no restrictions on the length of the lines.

Head over to PTWWW and check out other writers take on the challenge.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn

 

New To Me Poetry: Pantoum

Intrusions of the world muted: no T.V., no radio, no phone.
The quiet is deafening, no shouts or screams to cut my calm like knives.
The house is empty, and I finally have some peace and time alone!
Go fly solo; more should invite the muse of solitude in their lives!
 
The quiet is deafening, no shouts or screams to cut my calm like knives.
The children run around with friends, while Wife takes time to have a “girl’s night”.
Go fly solo; more should invite the muse of solitude in their lives.
“This time is mine,” I think, cigarette dangling as I search for a light.
 
The children run around with friends, while wife takes time to have a girl’s night.
Life catches up; everybody’s too busy for time with Dad, it seems.
“This time is mine!” I think, cigarette dangling as I search for a light.
It is funny how reality never matches up with our dreams.
 
Life catches up; everybody’s too busy for time with Dad, it seems.
Intrusions of the world muted: no T.V., no radio, no phone.
It is funny how reality never matches up with our dreams.
The house is empty and I finally have some peace and time alone.

***

For Paint The World With Words poetic form of the week: Pantoum. What is a Pantoum? Amreen has an explanation from Poets.org on her post, but I also found a different source with some differences in form at:

http://www.volecentral.co.uk/vf/pantoum.htm

There are several different ways to write a Pantoum, a form that originated in Malaysia. According to Bob Newman, who runs the site above, a “classical” Pantoum consists of an abba rhyme scheme, with a strict syllable count of 8 syllables per line, with the second and fourth line of a stanza serving as the first and third line of the next stanza. The whole thing loops around, and the first and third lines of the first stanza serve as the second and fourth of the last stanza.

A different source he quotes claims that a “classical” Pantoum consists of 4 stanzas of 4 lines, for a total of 16, and that rhyming is not required.

More modern forms, which is the form I did, have an abab pattern: the first line rhymes the third and the second line rhymes the fourth. The second and fourth lines of a stanza still serve as the first and third lines of the next, with the first and third lines of the first stanza serving as the second and last line (in this particular modern form, anyway).

There is another way to write a Pantoum. According to Poets.org:

However, as the pantoum spread, and Western writers altered and adapted the form, the importance of rhyming and brevity diminished. The modern pantoum is a poem of any length, composed of four-line stanzas in which the second and fourth lines of each stanza serve as the first and third lines of the next stanza. The last line of a pantoum is often the same as the first.

So, here’s what I did:

I took the “classical” format of 4 stanzas of 4 lines each, for a total of 16 lines. I kept the requirement of the second and fourth lines of a stanza being the first and third lines of the next. For the ending stanza, I went with the first and third lines of the first stanza as the second and fourth lines. This means the last line will not be the same as the first. (Sorry, Poets.org, I liked the other way better)

To cap it off, I tried to do the whole thing in American Sentences, a form of American Haiku created by Allen Ginsberg. An American Sentence is 17 syllables and follows the same basic rules as Japanese Haiku, but is written in the Western linear fashion of left to right, instead of up and down.

Don’t know if I actually pulled that off or not, as this is my first time experimenting with them.

My Pantoum (American Pantoum?) breaks down as follows:

4 stanzas of 4 lines each

17 syllables per line in American Sentence style

2nd and 4th line of a stanza serves as 1st and 3rd of the next, except for the ending stanza. Ending stanza’s 2nd and 4th lines copy 1st and 3rd of the first stanza.

ABAB rhyme pattern.

Use different punctuation to change the meaning and tone of sentences.

Whew! I didn’t find this form too hard, but the varying ways it can be written can be dizzying. I took what I liked, threw in something different for “fun” and did my own thing. Find what you like and feel free to do the same. That’s one of the wonderful things about poetry.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn

 

PTWWW-Nonet: Flirt

she sways, breathing her life into me

to and fro, she inflames passion

heart racing, my breath deepens

I reach for her, wanting

she dances away

smiling, teasing

laughing eyes

little

minx

My attempt at a Nonet poem for Paint The World With WordsPoetic Form of the Week. This is a simple format, but difficult in the execution. After several false starts, I used a random word generator to come up with a subject for the poem. Fortunately, that word ended up being “minx” which helped focus my thoughts!

The nonet consists of nine lines that break down like so:

line 1 – 9 syllables

line 2 – 8 syllables

line 3 – 7 syllables

line 4 – 6 syllables

line 5 – 5 syllables

line 6 – 4 syllables

line 7 – 3 syllables

line 8 – 2 syllables

line 9 – 1 syllable

Hope you enjoy my attempt. Head on over to PTWWW and check out other’s poems. Feel free to add your own!

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn