Carpe Diem Special-Only The First Line: “Hunger Moon”

 

hunger moon
stomach growls – wolf on the hunt
child dreams of next meal
 

For Carpe Diem Haiku Kai Special’s “Only The First Line”. In this challenge, Chevrefeuille gives a line that must be used as the first line in our haiku. The first line this time is “Hunger Moon.” From Chevrefeuille: “Hunger Moon” is the name of the full moon of January as it is mentioned inThomas’s Old Farmers Almanac (founded in 1792). During this month the wolves once roamed the countryside, thus suggesting the name wolf moon. In cold and temperate climates of the Northern Hemisphere, it was difficult to find food during January, thus the name hunger moon.

Head over to Carpe Diem Haiku Kai Special and check out this and other special challenges to help inspire your haiku.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #27: Ese’s “I Catch the Sunrise”

 

great expectations
entangled in fishing line
i catch the sunrise            (c. Ese)
 
plop! golden rays return home
renewal for soft sunset                (c. J. Milburn)
 

A Carpe Diem Special: Tan Renga Challenge #27 “I Catch The Sunrise”. This week’s beautiful haiku comes from Ese at Ese’s Voice. The goal of the challenge is to add a second stanza consisting of two-lines with each line having 7 syllables.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn

Carpe Diem #378: Irkutsk

time of revelry
music inspires youth to dance
green-eyed monster strikes
 

For Carpe Diem #378: Irkutsk. We are stopping in Irkutsk with Paulo Coelho and Hilal on our train trip in Aleph. From Chevrefeuille: We have arrived at Irkutsk where Paulo has an appointment with a few of his readers. His publishers have created a grand party for him with a local singer and local dancers. He has Hilal with him as his companion. Hilal feels free and attracted to a younger man of her own age and she dances with him. Paulo is glad to see that, but also feels somewhat of jealousy. 

Head over to Carpe Diem for more information about Irkutsk and to catch up with our journey so far.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn

Carpe Diem #377: Tayshet

horror of battle
prisoner of war long passed
international
 

We are passing Tayshet, administrative center for gulag labor camps Oserlag and Angarstroy, with Paulo Coelho in Aleph.  From Wikipedia: According to some survivor accounts, between Tayshet and Bratsk there is “a dead man under every sleeper.” Along with Japanese prisoners from the Kwantung Army, German prisoners of war formed a large proportion of the forced labor contingent, generally under a 25-year sentence.

Prisoners work at Belbaltlag, a Gulag camp for building the White Sea-Baltic Sea Canal .
From the 1932 documentary film, Baltic to White Sea Water Way. Courtesy of the Central Russian Film and Photo Archive.

Carpe Diem #375: Krasnoyarsk

status binds love’s choice
refuge sought in holy hands
flames know no lines
 

Emblem of the Inquisition

For Carpe Diem #375: Krasnoyarsk. Our next stop on the train trip with Paulo Coelho in Aleph. Here Paulo delves deeper into “The Ring of Fire” and discovers more of the common history between him and Hilal. In a past life Hilal was the daughter of a rich man while Paulo was a poor boy. They fell in love, but their respective statuses prevent them from ever marrying.

Past Paulo joins the Dominican Order, the order responsible for prosecuting the Inquisition, and ends up condemning past Hilal to be burned.

For a more in-depth look at the city and the story, head over to Carpe Diem.

Hope you enjoy.

Happy Reading and Writing!

J. Milburn