Carpe Diem “Little Ones”: Not So Small Things

This week for the Carpe Diem Haiku Kai Special challenge “Little Ones” we are asked to create an American Sentence. Created by Allen Ginsberg to make an “American” form of haiku, the sentence follows the same syllable count as a traditional haiku: 17.

It differs in often including a time or place, and is also written left-to-right instead of vertically. Here is my attempt:

A city ever bustles, never slowing; small things are lost in haste.

File:Riischildren.jpg

Children sleeping in Mulberry Street – Jacob Riis photo New York, United States of America (1890)

From http://www.horizonsforhomelesschildren.org/understanding-homelessness/statistics-definitions/:

Child and family homelessness is an escalating crisis. Accurate data is difficult to obtain and validate due to the transitional and often “invisible” nature of the population.

  • One in every 45 children in the U.S. is homeless each year (Source: America’s Youngest Outcasts: State Report Card on Child Homelessness, National Center on Family Homelessness)
  • More than 1.6 million children in the U.S. are homeless each year (Source: America’s Youngest Outcasts: State Report Card on Child Homelessness, National Center on Family Homelessness)
  • Family homelessness is the fastest-growing segment of the homeless population, accounting for 41 percent of the nation’s homeless population in 2009 (National Coalition for the Homelessness)

Wishing you and yours well.

J. Milburn

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7 thoughts on “Carpe Diem “Little Ones”: Not So Small Things

  1. you capture the desperation and sadness of those figures in just one short line. Very impressive!

  2. Very impressive American Sentence Jeremy … your first attempt? It will not become my ‘cup of tea’ I think, but I like to do American Sentences sometimes.

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